Should you pay for LinkedIn?

I constantly go on about the basic things can do even if you are on the free version of LinkedIn – ie not the upgraded “pro” version.

Even on the free version, your basic criteria should be:

  • Having a professional photo (we have a fantastic photographer who works with many of our clients – let me know if you want her details)
  • Customising your “vanity URL” (send me an email and I’ll send you updated instructions on how to do this – it takes 2 mins!)
  • Adjusting your headline to be more specific
  • Crafting a first-person summary showing personality and why you do what you do
  • Writing a few first-person sentences about your current and each of your previous job roles, in full sentences, summarising what brought you the/what you did/learned/etc – also to weave your story together and reinforce certain things about you.

After this you can upload well-designed media files, post blogs, and actively participate in sharing, posting, commenting.

“I’ve done all that, I’m ready to go advanced!”

Ok, yes some people (not many) are “there” already. Great! But I still dont want you spending money unnecessarily, like an unused gym membership.

In fact, if you are not in recruitment or full-time sales, I would hold off on any pro version until you are completely prepped to warrant spending that money. And if you are in recruitment and sales, the prep still applies, so you really make the most of your paid subscription!

Here’s what I recommend so you have everything ready before you press “yes” on the monthly subscription to LinkedIn!

For prospecting, the preparation would include:

  1. Being clear on the message you’re approaching people with
  2. Having something of value to offer
  3. Have a clear and easy next step – watch a video/download a PDF – that doesn’t take up more than a minute of their time to act on.
  4. Having identified what type of person you’re looking to approach (industry, position, interests)
  5. Having a plan for your next 2-3 follow on steps from the first point of contact.

Similarly, for recruitment, you can follow these rules – your initial contact should be brief (as most people are busy and dip in and out of LinkedIn) and carefully written to create a positive reaction (show you as someone worth working with, not give too much information but enough to get their interest, and have a clear and easy next step)

This prep is needed to have a successful outcome and means you have your ducks in a row if you are going to be paying a monthly fee!

Your Comments

  1. Thanks for the tips. I’ll keep that in mind next time I think about choosing the pro version.

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