Where Tarzan was smart

 This is a guest post from Michael Schmeja Consulting. I received it in our inbox and asked if we could post it as an article on our blog. He said yes! His post follows:

Throughout this pandemic I have been asked by people who:

  • a. want to change jobs, as they want to change their life
  • b. have been made redundant and look for a job
  • c. didn’t like their old one, but all of a sudden realize how good it is to actually have a job, and are now looking for a change in mindset

A few things are common in all seekers

First, not many ever had a career plan, not even the slightest idea. Things just happened as they plotted along. Salary rises, promotions, change of employers, redundancies.

Second, when a change of job happens, it happened without much deep drilling of their Why. In particular, when they didn’t like the old one. The new one simply looked better, was an escape route, sometimes paid a bit more, the grass looked greener.

Third, people aren’t knowing their strengths and weaknesses but are 100% sure they know the weaknesses of their companies, bosses, colleagues and roles.

Fourth, and this mostly happens when desperation is the biggest, rush like a rash sets in. It’s got to happen straight away; future plans and forecast are being painted too rosy and one can smell defeat at the first corner.

I love working long term with these people. If you want to do this properly you can’t just talk twice and expect to change what you made a routine for years, sometimes decades.

Fact is, you don’t do it alone, otherwise you would have already done it. Like in sports, you will hardly improve your game alone, you will hire some help.

Here are a few reasons if you fall into a), b) or c) why you should work with a coach. (and not only for those)

In addition to first, you need a plan.

I know things are harder to predict in 2021 but you need a rough idea in which direction you are going, what are your goals posts, what are your alternative roads. Where do you start, i.e., what is it you possess, how did you get to the start line, what got you there, etc. Fact-finding.

In addition to second, what’s your Why.

You probably can’t hear this anymore: What is your Why? But let me tell you from the clients I have spoken to. In a forced change, chances are high you aren’t running towards something in your new role; you are running away from something old & sticky. If you make no effort in finding out what you are running away from you will run into the same thing with your new employer. This is deep inner work. You and I will find that out. That, I guarantee you.

Third, you need to know who you are and how others see you, as you can only change what you know.

If the perception of your personality isn’t congruent with how others see you, you can’t win the long game. There are very efficient tools available to help you there.

Fourth, remember where Tarzan was smart.

Remember how Tarzan swings through the jungle? He doesn’t let go of the previous vine until the next vine is supporting his weight.

You can do everything you want to do, but you need patience. This is a process. We all tend to overestimate what we can do in the short-term and underestimate what we can achieve long-term. That’s why I prefer working with my clients long-term.

If you are hesitant of making the investment in yourself this isn’t for you, and you are not my client. And that’s ok.

But when there is a fire in your belly and your vision to grow as a person, and let go of your past limitations is clear, renew your relationship with your inner disruptor.Be not average. Ever. Please. 

With love and respect

Michael 

Michael Schmeja Consulting
http://www.michaelschmeja.com

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *