Insight, advice, news and chit chat

By Vadim Sherbakov

Written and researched by Chris Higgins

When many people think of adding content to a blog, they think first (and sometimes only) of text and pictures (maybe video). And while text is justifiably the foundation of good content, it need not be the only part. You do not need to be Alfred Einstein (Albert’s brother) to learn how to embed other types of content. In this blog post I hope to help make the process simple, straightforward and effortless. Okay, that’s an exaggeration. Not effortless exactly, but less effortful. And much less effort than it took to research the post.

competitions-instagram

So, you want to run a competition? Perhaps people win something? Perhaps they win tickets to an event you are holding? Or a prize for the best submitted image? Or perhaps their prize is that their submitted image (if it’s a photo contest) gets featured on your channel?

This is a great way to give your Instagram some interactivity, and hopefully – the holy grail in social media – “User Generated Content” – eeek – such an exciting thought!

But the worry? It will be all tumbleweeds. Your contest will fall flat on its face. It will be an embarrassment which no one dares discuss. So, I wrote this post to help prevent this.

stop-stealing-images

If you have a blog you will probably know this – adding images to your post will make it more visually appealing to the reader, will break up the text and improve readability and will improve your chances of your post getting shared around the web.

However many people don’t realise that if you just go and Google an image, those resulting images are not yours to use. If you use an image you find via Google images, you are essentially stealing.
The image will be one that is on another person’s website or blog. This image could have originated by someone taking that picture themselves, or finding it on a licensed photo library.

newsletter-blog

This post was written for Constant Contact

I have a feeling that people are confused about the difference between a newsletter and a blog so I have been meaning to write this for a while!

What may seem like normal words to us digital marketing folk can seem like jargon to some. So if you ever think someone is a bit mixed up about this – show them this post and hopefully all will become clear!

The main difference is where you see it

changes-are-afoot-september

Changes happen so quickly in our industry – the industry of marketing, social media and technology. New tools and apps keep being launched, add ons and upgrades, social media networks changing their minds all the time, new stats and insights, and social media success and failure stories for brands big and small.

Today, in light of our latest newsletter theme which is “changes are afoot”  – we will start with three (always a good number) which I believe are immensely relevant, helpful and useful.

I have a social media tip, a tool we use for task management at TLD, and a new way to think about your website. I hope you find these things as useful as I do!

digitalmarketingtruths

If you feel like things in digital marketing move too fast, you’re right. Things change all the time. I might spend ages creating a video on how to shorten URLs for Twitter and then a better way might come along, meaning I have to do that video all over. But there are certain things – thought processes, concepts, and cold hard truths – that are just always true – when it comes to marketing yourself, your business or organisation online. Here are 6 of them.

It’s not about making a sale, it’s about making an impression

subheadings

Your headlines may be catchy. Your writing may be amazing. Well crafted words, punchy sentences, and amazing insight into the minds of your reader.  But if your blog is longer than 150 words,  you need to add subheadings – or build them in as you go!

Big blocks of text can feel like a chore to read

People have so much media coming their way that they have to process quickly – they tend to put aside for later anything that will take them more than 30 seconds to process.

The solution: Break up your text with subheadings and bullets

Copy in a blog shouldn’t go more than 2 paragraphs without something to break it up. This can be an image, a bulleted list, an outtake, or a subheading.

One ultra important further tip: Use subheadings that have meaning

wendy-elodie

I love a success story – don’t you?

One such is the lovely Snowbizz – a family ski resort. Mum and daughter Wendy and Elodie came for 5 sessions with me – and as a result, completely transformed their marketing. Yay! I asked Wendy to write me a little bit about how the experience was for her, after our initial sessions. So most of this was written by Wendy – except for the questions! Below is Wendy’s wonderful Q+A interview:

personalbranding

We judge others online – so it’s fair to assume others are judging us online. And so often, when you Google a person, you find a lot of information about them that is probably not the full story. But yet, you must admit – you have made assumptions on people based on what you discover online about them. If this is true – then perhaps you need to do an online audit? Here are 8 ways to manage your online personal brand.